causes of domestic abuse research papers

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Causes of domestic abuse research papers creative writing courses melbourne

Causes of domestic abuse research papers

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Note each section, and what to have under it. It is a guide or a reference point for your research paper. Use your outline as a guide. Draft the first copy of your paper. Bring out everything you want to include in the essay, as in this piece, you have room to make mistakes. Proofread, to identify any grammatical errors and typos.

Also, add any parts that you probably left out. Alternatively, you can hand it over to a friend to proofread on your behalf. Correct all the mistakes and make a final copy of the same. As a student, you may sometimes be overwhelmed by your academic work. If you ever need help writing a domestic violence research paper, you can use competitive bidding platforms like ours to get the best writers.

What is a Domestic Violence Research Paper? Domestic Violence Research Paper Outline Like other essays, a domestic violence research paper consists of the following parts: A title — The title, usually a few words, briefly describes your article. It is the face of your writing. The Abstract — Since you are writing a research paper on domestic violence, you need a brief about your writing.

The abstract includes; the purpose of the research, its basic design, findings, and recommendations. A descriptive introduction — The first paragraph of your essay is the introduction. It consists of a welcoming phrase or quote, the topic sentence or thesis, and a catchy hook. The introduction should tell the reader the intent of the essay and what to expect in the latter parts. It should be attention-grabbing to make the reader want to go deeper.

Body paragraphs — Body paragraphs make up the main sections of your essay. In a domestic violence paper, we break this section into several sub-sections. Literature Review — Describes the types of domestic violence you wish to identify in the essay. Support by giving evidence and citing examples of such cases. Explain the causes of domestic violence.

Focus on factors that contribute to domestic violence cases. On each point, provide substantial evidence. Make your text as understandable as possible. Also, delve into the impact of domestic violence. Describe the effect these vices have on both direct and indirect victims. You can include physical injuries, psychological tall, and health consequences. This sample domestic violence research paper is published for educational and informational purposes only.

Free research papers, are not written by our writers, they are contributed by users, so we are not responsible for the content of this free sample paper. If you want to buy a high quality research paper on domestic violence at affordable price please use custom research paper writing services. Domestic violence occurs when a current or former intimate partner exerts dominance and control in a relationship through physical, sexual, or psychological-emotional abuse, resulting in physical or emotional trauma to the victim.

Other forms of domestic violence include stalking and dating violence. Other terms used for domestic violence include intimate partner violence, domestic abuse, family violence, spousal abuse, dating violence, wife abuse, and battering. Domestic violence exists within all cultures, ethnicities, faiths, age groups, education levels, income levels, and sexual orientations.

Domestic violence can occur between many different kinds of couples: married or unmarried couples, couples who live in rural areas and urban areas, those that cohabitate or live separately, couples that had been formerly married or had dated, and between heterosexual or same-sex couples. Furthermore, sexual intimacy is not required to be present in a relationship in order for domestic violence to occur. While the statutory term for domestic violence in most states usually includes other family members besides intimate partners, such as children, parents, siblings, sometimes roommates, and so forth, practitioners typically apply the term domestic violence to a coercive, systemic pattern of physical, sexual, or psychological abuse between intimate partners.

Victims of domestic violence can be women or men; however, the overwhelming majority of domestic violence involves women as victims and men as perpetrators. For this reason, many organizations concerned with domestic violence focus their attention and services specifically on violence against women and their children.

The following section of this research paper discusses the types and prevalence of domestic violence. It also discusses domestic violence warning signs, stalking, dating violence, and domestic violence in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender LGBT community. The research paper concludes with a discussion of the judicial response to domestic violence such as domestic violence and family courts. The first shelters in the United States opened their doors in Minneapolis-St.

Soon thereafter, a shelter opened in Boston, Massachusetts, and Casa Myrna Vasquez, also in Boston, opened its doors as the first shelter providing services primarily for Latinas. The first support group for battered lesbians began in Seattle in Awareness and services have increased exponentially over the past three decades, and as of September , a total of 1, domestic violence programs were operational across the United States National Center for Victims of Crime, As previously mentioned, physical, sexual, and psychological violence, stalking, and dating violence are different types of abuse experienced by victims of domestic violence on a daily basis.

Each type of abuse is discussed below. Physical violence involves the use of force, possibly resulting in physical harm, disability, or death. Examples of physical abuse include hitting, scratching, shoving, grabbing, biting, throwing, choking, shaking, kicking, burning, physical restraint, use of a weapon, or otherwise causing intentional physical injury to the victim.

Sexual violence occurs when one forces or compels a person to engage in a sexual act or experiences sexual contact against his or her will. If a participant cannot communicate an understanding of and willingness to engage in a sexual act for any reason, including but not limited to disability, illness, and alcohol or drug intoxication, and the sex act is nonetheless attempted or completed by a perpetrator, an act of sexual violence transpires.

In addition, sexual violence sometimes occurs within physically or emotionally abusive relationships where the victim agrees to sexual activity solely as a means to avoid additional abuse or intimidation. Examples of sexual violence include rape including marital and date rape , attempted rape, inappropriate touching, unwanted voyeurism or exhibitionism, sexual harassment, or any other type of sexual activity to which one does not willingly agree.

Psychological violence is also commonly called emotional abuse and refers to behaviors of intimidation, control, or coercion resulting in emotional trauma. While a relationship does not need to include physical or sexual violence to be abusive, any prior acts or threats of physical or sexual violence do constitute psychological violence. A relationship does not have to include all of the above behaviors in order to be considered abusive; a partner who attempts to wield dominance and control within a relationship through any threat or act of physical, sexual, or psychological abuse is committing an act of domestic violence.

It is also important to note that while a few of the above behaviors are not necessarily prosecutable in criminal court, they nevertheless constitute abuse. Research has indicated that many victims of domestic violence have experienced stalking behavior from a current or former intimate partner. These incursions may increase in frequency as a stalker tries to exert more control over a victim, sometimes in response to the loss of control he or she experienced at the end of the relationship.

When stalking behaviors escalate, they may lead to outright threats or incidents of physical violence. Nationally, all 50 of the United States have implemented anti-stalking laws and protective orders for victims. However, not all states treat the first offense of stalking as a felony; in most states, first-time offenders are charged with a misdemeanor.

In some cases, a felony conviction occurs only after a third offense. Dating violence is a form of domestic violence that has been receiving much attention in recent years from the research and practice community those who work with abuse victims. However, there are a few notable differences between dating violence within adolescent and young adult couples high school and college age and domestic violence within older couples who perhaps live together, have children in common, or are married.

Many young people who are involved in dating relationships experience unhealthy and abusive behaviors, but the problem is often overlooked because the relationship is less likely to be viewed as long-term or dependent in nature. Young people in relationships today do not necessarily view their relationships as long-term, as relationships were once assumed to be. In addition, both men and women view relationships as being more casual in general today, compared to previous generations. Statistics show that dating violence is a serious problem among youth.

Research suggests that college students are highly vulnerable to dating violence because so many are involved in romantic relationships during these formative years. Dating violence research has produced interesting findings regarding the relationship between gender and victimization. According to a recent study of approximately 2, college students attending two large southeastern U.

This is consistent with a Fact Sheet distributed by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence NCADV, , which reports that 1 in 5 college students say they have experienced violence within a current dating relationship, about a third have experienced dating violence within a previous relationship, and over half of acquaintance rapes on college campuses occur within the context of a dating relationship.

Overall, the relationship between gender and dating violence is one that needs to continue to be explored because there are many questions that current research is unable to answer. Specifically, while there are many studies that discuss the prevalence of different forms of dating violence, these studies very rarely also inquire as to the context in which this violence occurs.

This makes it hard to understand the quantitative data, and it makes it difficult to move forward on the best way to educate the community and respond to the issue given the fact that nondating violence research indicates that women are significantly more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence compared to men.

In many states, the law simply overlooks victims of dating violence when it comes to protection. As reported by NCADV , in many states the criminal and civil domestic violence laws only apply to victims who are married to, cohabitate with, or have a child in common with the perpetrator.

Thirty-nine states and the District of Columbia allow victims of dating violence to apply for orders of protection against a perpetrator. Eleven states do not recognize dating violence in their statutes. In addition, the Bureau of Justice Statistics , reports that females represent an overwhelming majority of family violence victims, spousal abuse victims, and dating violence victims, with women at the greatest risk for intimate partner violence between the ages of 20 and Many victim advocates suspect that the majority of violence committed by women in abusive relationships takes place for purposes of self-defense against an abusive male partner.

Of those served, about half sought shelter. Also during that time, 20, domestic violence hotline calls were answered across the country. The report also found that 7, requests for services were unmet due to lack of space or resources. Clearly, the pervasiveness of domestic violence across the United States is overwhelming, with a tremendous need for services for victims and their children on a daily basis.

Scholars have had a difficult time developing explanations for the occurrence of domestic violence. Yet, it is widely understood that perpetrators turn to abusive behaviors as a means to gain power and control over their partner. Behaviors of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse within a relationship typically increase in their severity over time, as the perpetrator seeks to dominate the victim more fully.

But abusers may differ from one another when it comes to the reasons why they seek to increase their power through abuse. The majority of relationships characterized by domestic violence experience what is referred to as the cycle of violence, which consists of three stages: 1 the tension-building stage, 2 the explosive stage, and 3 the honeymoon stage.

The cycle is not the same for all victims in terms of duration, but there is evidence that the violence escalates as the cycle increases in frequency. Victims become so accustomed to the cycle that based on the behavior of their partner, they can usually anticipate when their batterer will become abusive. The first stage, the tension-building stage, is a time that can be characterized by extremely high stress.

The batterer may vent this increased tension by taking it out on objects or by acting aggressively in other ways, and it is common for the batterer to act overly jealous of his partner and attempt to isolate the partner from family and friends more than normal.

While this is happening, many victims feel like they are walking on eggshells and they try to do anything they can to stop their batterer from becoming physically abusive. The tension-building stage is followed by the explosive stage. The term for this stage is appropriate because this is the point in the cycle when the batterer releases his accumulation of stress by perpetrating violence against his partner in an act of rage.

This may consist of either physical or sexual violence. Law enforcement may or may not become involved at this stage, depending on whether the victim or a third party calls the police. If law enforcement does become involved during this stage, many batterers who remain at the scene often appear very calm and collected to the officer, since their stress was released through their perpetration of violence.

On the other hand, victims often appear confused, hysterical, terrified, shocked, angry, afraid, and degraded. The final stage is referred to as the honeymoon stage. This stage is composed of acts on the part of the batterer to convince the victim to stay in the relationship, including promises to the victim that things will change.

The batterer will typically ask for forgiveness and shower the victim with various presents as an expression of love and commitment to the relationship. During this stage, batterers also may seek counseling or go to church to show the victim that they are committed to changing their behavior.

Unfortunately, victims who have been through the cycle before want to believe the promises that are being made, but instead feel depressed, helpless, hopeless, and trapped. While the batterer may feel somewhat in control again, he is still fearful that the victim may leave or obtain the involvement of the criminal justice system. Although apologies are made, batterers tend to minimize the abuse they inflicted on the victim. In sum, the honeymoon stage eventually cycles back to the tension-building phase, since the cycle of violence is a continual repetitious pattern.

One explanation behind domestic abuse is that the perpetrator suffers from certain mental disorders that lead him to seek psychological gratification through dysfunctional relationships. Detractors of this theory point out that most domestic abusers manage to function normally in other relationships, not necessarily behaving aggressively toward others in their daily life.

While some abusers probably do suffer from mental illness or exhibit some signs of personality disorders, it is difficult to claim psychopathology as the main cause of domestic violence. A more widely accepted theory from the feminist school of thought, gender role theory is a perspective that sees institutionalized patriarchy as an explanation for domestic violence.

As such, an abuser who expects his partner to fill a traditionally subservient feminine gender role may resort to power and control behaviors to assert his power in the relationship. While this explanation rings true for many couples in abusive relationships, it fails to explain the occurrence of domestic violence within lesbian and gay relationships.

There are specific reasons for domestic violence between same-sex couples, which will be discussed later in this research paper. However, one may argue that gender role theory can apply to homosexual relationships as well, in that the abuser may be trying to achieve a perceived societal gender norm within the relationship.

It is difficult to pinpoint one distinct explanation for the epidemic of domestic violence; every relationship is unique, and abusers exhibit violent behaviors for a variety of reasons. Ultimately, it is most likely a combination of social, psychological, cultural, and individual factors that lead abusers to control their victims through domestic violence. While the majority of research on domestic violence refers to heterosexual couples, studies focusing on intimate partner abuse within gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered GLBT relationships show that it happens at the same rates Renzetti, Since their inception, domestic violence shelters have become more inclusive in welcoming and assisting gay women.

Services are fraught with potentials for re-victimization that pivots on homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism. To this end, the deleterious effects of homophobia and heterosexism cannot be discounted in the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender LGBT survivors of IPV [interpersonal violence].

In addition to societal stereotypes in regard to homosexuality, myths also exist around intimate partner abuse within GLBT relationships. Stereotypical beliefs about gender roles and expectations may lead others to think that women are not capable of battering and that men cannot be labeled as victims.

As with heterosexual couples, abuse in GLBT relationships is not always physical, does not only occur between couples who cohabitate, and it happens between young dating partners as well as adults. Legislation in regard to abuse within GLBT relationships is limited. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence , 30 states and the District of Columbia have domestic violence laws that are gender neutral and include dating partners as well as those living together.

Conversely, three states Delaware, Montana, and South Carolina have language that explicitly excludes same-sex partners from legal protection in cases of abuse. One of the major efforts of the domestic violence movement, from the beginning, has been to debunk commonly believed stereotypes and myths about domestic violence. This is important because an accurate awareness of the issue cannot occur within society if the general public believes that domestic violence is a problem that only affects certain groups of people and is therefore not in need of attention since it is not that common.

In addition, one of the easiest ways to acquire an overall understanding of the basic elements of domestic violence is to debunk commonly believed stereotypes.

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Bring out everything you want to include in the essay, as in this piece, you have room to make mistakes. Proofread, to identify any grammatical errors and typos. Also, add any parts that you probably left out.

Alternatively, you can hand it over to a friend to proofread on your behalf. Correct all the mistakes and make a final copy of the same. As a student, you may sometimes be overwhelmed by your academic work. If you ever need help writing a domestic violence research paper, you can use competitive bidding platforms like ours to get the best writers.

What is a Domestic Violence Research Paper? Domestic Violence Research Paper Outline Like other essays, a domestic violence research paper consists of the following parts: A title — The title, usually a few words, briefly describes your article.

It is the face of your writing. The Abstract — Since you are writing a research paper on domestic violence, you need a brief about your writing. The abstract includes; the purpose of the research, its basic design, findings, and recommendations.

A descriptive introduction — The first paragraph of your essay is the introduction. It consists of a welcoming phrase or quote, the topic sentence or thesis, and a catchy hook. The introduction should tell the reader the intent of the essay and what to expect in the latter parts. It should be attention-grabbing to make the reader want to go deeper.

Body paragraphs — Body paragraphs make up the main sections of your essay. In a domestic violence paper, we break this section into several sub-sections. Literature Review — Describes the types of domestic violence you wish to identify in the essay. Support by giving evidence and citing examples of such cases. Explain the causes of domestic violence.

Focus on factors that contribute to domestic violence cases. On each point, provide substantial evidence. Make your text as understandable as possible. Also, delve into the impact of domestic violence. Describe the effect these vices have on both direct and indirect victims. You can include physical injuries, psychological tall, and health consequences.

Do not leave out the economic and social effects, too. After you have outlined the types and causes of domestic violence, you cannot fail to provide your audience with a solution. Suggest measures you think would reduce occurrences of domestic violence and support by showing how these measures will be useful.

Conclusion A conclusion summarizes all your points. According to Lockton and Ward , this may be because of strong emotions such as difficulties in regulating anger, extreme jealousy, and low self-esteem. One may also develop the urge to control when they feel their partner is superior to them in terms of socioeconomic or educational background. Some people, especially men with a traditional mindset, might believe that they have full control over their families and that women including their wives should be submissive to them.

Others may also have borrowed this behavior from the families in which they grew up if domestic violence was a common occurrence. Lockton and Ward observe that once drunk or high on hard drugs, a person may not be able to control their anger or approach to controversial issues between them and their partners.

They might also be undergoing protracted unemployment periods and would be angered by any slight disagreement which would easily trigger them into violence. Financial issues are another stressor that may make an individual become easily angered and often, they would want to release this anger on their partners.

One may further have such perceived failures as failure to gain promotion at work and develop hopelessness and eventually turn violent. Victims of domestic violence suffer from a range of physical and psychological effects. They may die, become ill, get seriously injured or become disabled and this explains why domestic and family violence is a leading cause of disability and illness especially for women Johnson, Victims may also suffer psychological and emotional trauma that may see them become depressed or angered and may even cause serious physical harm to themselves including committing suicide.

In an attempt to escape from the never ending violence after sustaining physical health injuries some of which may not be treatable, victims might end up becoming homeless. They might decide to start using alcohol and other drugs in order to deal with the pain. Further, children who witness domestic violence can develop serious physical and behavioral and emotional problems.

They may start complaining of such general pain and aches as stomach aches and headaches. In addition to generally not feeling physically well, children may also develop nervousness and their attention spans may become short. Anxiety, aggressiveness, and changes in how a child socializes with others are some of the emotional and behavioral problems that can result due to domestic violence Johnson, Due to traumatic experiences, mental health disorders, emotional insecurity, and depression can follow.

A child can then start to develop problems with cognition and attitude at school while at the same time lacking essential skills such as problem-solving skills. One way to reduce or curb domestic violence is to reform legislation and ensure that the vice falls under the law.

This should include repealing or doing away with all laws that are discriminative against women. In this respect, well defined marriage laws should be put in place so that people may know what to expect when entering matrimonial unions. As suggested by Chan , the penalties against domestic violence perpetrators and abusers should be so harsh that one hardly thinks of engaging in the same.

In addition, all societies should help those in marriage to become economically independent. Economic independence will ensure that neither partner in a marriage feels superior or inferior to the other partner Chan, A woman who is financially stable would not have to stay in an abusive relationship because they would be able to afford their own home and even fend for their children on their own.

Similarly, an economically stable man would not develop stresses associated with financial troubles or inability to care for his family. Such a man would be less likely to become abusive or develop unnecessary angers. Domestic violence may also be addressed at the family or spousal level, with a view to avoiding its detrimental repercussions.

Each partner in a spousal relationship should develop a safety plan to use during a violent situation. The plan should clearly outline how the victim may exit their home in a safe and quick manner in case of a violence. It should be noteworthy that this is a reactionary measure and not a preventive one and should only be used if the above preventive measures fail to work.

Domestic violence exposes victims and children to untold physical and psychological suffering and should be adequately addressed.