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Purchase homework whiz spell checker

Please get in touch via our Facebook page if there are features you would like to add in the future. For your children's security you do need to Sign up and Login to Share lists, but not for any other feature! This version fixes a bug where apostrophes were not being recognised in some words lists.

Our children enjoy using spelling whizz and the school release the weekly spellings making it a more fun way to learn. Really happy with the app. Cons It is not clear why the app requires you to log in giving your email address in order to share a spelling list, as you don't need to use the same email address to share a list. No total score is given when a child finishes a list. You can look up number of attempts for each word individually and colour is red if the LAST response was wrong.

But unhelpfully each time the list is used the 'attempts' score merges. The sharing list facility is only helpful for children all using their own ipad. If you want more than one child to use the same device their attempts are merged with the previous user's score, so no useful individual scores. Pros The look cover check approach is helpful It's good to be able to add your own word lists. Hi Vicky - if you log in you can securely share the lists you have created with anyone!

Its not about getting your email address. And if you tap on the i button on each wordlist you can see the words that the speller has tried, so you have a good record of what they have done. Hope this helps you! It's always a challenge to get Jonathan interested in his spelling homework so the iPad format provides an instant engagement platform. As a parent I get the reassurance that this app has been written by expert teachers who understand the curriculum and successful learning methodologies.

Jonathan benefitted from really understanding the learning journey as the app mirrors what he does in the classroom. I'd say this is a great way of supporting learning for boys who'd much rather be doing anything other than homework. The developer, richard cash , has not provided details about its privacy practices and handling of data to Apple.

The developer will be required to provide privacy details when they submit their next app update. Up to six family members will be able to use this app with Family Sharing enabled. App Store Preview. Screenshots iPad iPhone. Description Spell, create and share wordlists with Spelling Whizz App! Sep 28, Version 4. Ratings and Reviews.

App Privacy See Details. So the action - buying the present - is being performed for him. In the second case the recipient is Phillip , who is the recipient of the card direct object. Here are some example sentences. All the direct objects are in bold. Where an indirect object is included in the second set of examples, the indirect object is in italics. There are many tenses in English grammar to learn. Here you can view a full list of all the tenses with links to examples and explanations.

The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not. This is the main distinction. If you don't want to get tripped up with your grammar and makes mistake, you want to know how to deal with confusing words in grammar.

Here you will find lists of some of the most commonly confused words and detailed explanations so you can perfect your language. Sign up for free grammar tips, quizzes and lessons, straight into your inbox.

Contact Us. Put the words in brackets into the correct tense. Check your answers. This future perfect continuous quiz is a gap fill exercise and it tests you on affirmative statements, or positive statements. Place the verb in brackets into the correct tense. The future perfect is made of up 'will' plus 'have' and then the past participle. Direct and Indirect Objects. You might like these.

Types of Clauses in English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clause The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause.

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The office staff gave Phillip a card To whom did the staff give a card? So in the first case, the son is the recipient of the direct object the present. So the action - buying the present - is being performed for him. In the second case the recipient is Phillip , who is the recipient of the card direct object. Here are some example sentences. All the direct objects are in bold. Where an indirect object is included in the second set of examples, the indirect object is in italics.

There are many tenses in English grammar to learn. Here you can view a full list of all the tenses with links to examples and explanations. The two types of clauses in English grammar are the independent and dependent clause. Both have a subject and verb which makes them clauses, but while independent clauses express a complete thought, dependent clauses do not.

This is the main distinction. If you don't want to get tripped up with your grammar and makes mistake, you want to know how to deal with confusing words in grammar. Here you will find lists of some of the most commonly confused words and detailed explanations so you can perfect your language.

Sign up for free grammar tips, quizzes and lessons, straight into your inbox. Contact Us. Put the words in brackets into the correct tense. Check your answers. This future perfect continuous quiz is a gap fill exercise and it tests you on affirmative statements, or positive statements. Place the verb in brackets into the correct tense. The future perfect is made of up 'will' plus 'have' and then the past participle.

Direct and Indirect Objects. She thinks she is a witch , but she does not seem to have any powers. Table 2. You probably use these words every day in either speaking or writing. Each word has a segment in bold type that indicates the problem area of the word that is often spelled incorrectly.

Refer to this list as needed before, during, and after you write. Identify and correct the 10 commonly misspelled words in the following pa ssage. Brooklyn is one of the five boroughs that make up New York City. It is located on the eastern shore of Long Island directly accross the East River from the island of Manhattan.

When European settlers first arrived, Brooklyn was largely inhabited by the Lenapi, a collective name for several organized bands of Native American people who settled a large area of land that extended from upstate New York through the entire state of New Jersey. They are sometimes referred to as the Delaware Indians. Over time, the Lenapi succumbed to European diseases or conflicts between European settlers or other Native American enemies.

Finalley, they were pushed out of Brooklyn completely by the British. In , Brooklyn was the site of the first importent battle of the American Revolution known as the Battle of Brooklyn. The colonists lost this battle, which was led by George Washington, but over the next two years they would win the war, kicking the British out of the colonies once and for all.

By the end of the 19th century, Brooklyn grew to be a city in its own right. The completion of the Brooklyn Bridge was an ocasion for celebration; transportation and commerce between Brooklyn and Manhattan now became much easier. Eventually, in , Brooklyn lost its seperate identity as an independent city and became one of five boroughs of New York City.

Emails to prospective employers require thoughtful word choice, accurate spelling, and perfect punctuation. The best thing to do after you proofread an email to an employer and run the spell checker is to have an additional set of eyes go over it with you; one of your teachers may be able to read the email and give you suggestions for improvement.

Most colleges and universities have writing centres, which may also be able to assist you. Studying the list of commonly misspelled words in this chapter, or studying a list of your own, is one way to improve your spelling skills. What is your definition of a successful person? Perhaps success means a combination of both. In one paragraph, describe in detail what you think makes a person successful.

When you are finished, proofread your work for spelling errors. See if you catch any spelling errors that your partner missed. Effective writing involves making conscious word choices. When you prepare to sit down to write your first draft, you likely have already completed some freewriting exercises, chosen your topic, developed your thesis statement, written an outline, and even selected your sources. When it is time to write your first draft, start to consider which words to use to best convey your ideas to the reader.

Some writers are picky about word choice as they start drafting. Once you understand these tricks of the trade, you can move ahead confidently in writing your assignment. Remember, the skill and accuracy of your word choice is a major factor in developing your writing style. Precise selection of your words will help you be more clearly understood—in both writing and speaking. Even professional writers need help with the meanings, spellings, pronunciations, and uses of particular words. In fact, they rely on dictionaries to help them write better.

No one knows every word in the English language and their multiple uses and meanings, so all writers, from novices to professionals, can benefit from the use of dictionaries. Look at the following sample dictionary entry and see which of the preceding information you can identify:.

Like a dictionary, a thesaurus is another indispensable writing tool. A thesaurus gives you a list of synonyms—words that have the same or close to the same meaning as another word. It also lists antonyms—words with the opposite meaning of the word. A thesaurus will help you when you are looking for the perfect word with just the right meaning to convey your ideas. It will also help you learn more words and use the ones you already know more correctly.

Look at the following thesaurus entry:. A denotation is the dictionary definition of a word. A connotation , on the other hand, is the emotional or cultural meaning attached to a word. The connotation of a word can be positive, negative, or neutral. Keep in mind the connotative meaning when choosing a word. Look at the examples below:.

Denotation: Exceptionally thin and slight or meagre in body or size. Word used in a sentence: Although he was a premature baby and a scrawny child, Martin has developed into a strong man. They might find it to mean a weakness or a personal flaw; however, the word fits into the sentence appropriately. Connotation: Positive Based on cultural and personal impressions of what it means to be skinny, the reader may have positive connotations of the word skinny.

Connotation: Neutral In this sentence, lean has a neutral connotation. It does not call to mind an overly skinny person like the word scrawny , nor does imply the positive cultural impressions of the word skinny. It is merely a neutral descriptive word. Notice that all the words have a very similar denotation; however, the connotations of each word differ. In each of the following list items, you will find words with similar denotations. Use the table below.

Slang describes informal words that are considered nonstandard English. Slang often changes with passing fads and may be used by or familiar to only a specific group of people. Most people use slang when they speak and in personal correspondence, such as emails, text messages, and instant messages.

Slang is appropriate between friends in an informal context but should be avoided in formal academic writing. Frequent exposure to media and popular culture has desensitized many of us to slang. In certain situations, using slang at work may not be problematic, but keep in mind that words can have a powerful effect. Slang in professional emails or during meetings may convey the wrong message or even mistakenly offend someone. Edit the following paragraph by replacing the slang words and phrases with more formal language.

Rewrite the paragraph on your own sheet of paper. I felt like such an airhead when I got up to give my speech. As I walked toward the podium, I banged my knee on a chair. Man, I felt like such a klutz. I was so stressed out about being up there.

Wow, did I ever prove my point. My teacher said not to sweat it, though. Everyone gets nervous his or her first time speaking in public, and she said, with time, I would become a whiz at this speech giving stuff. I wonder if I have the guts to do it again. Plain: Whenever my brother and I get into an argument, he always says something that makes me really angry. Original: Whenever my brother and I get into an argument, he always says something that makes me want to go to the gym and punch the bag for a few hours.

Fran had an axe to grind with Benny, and she planned to confront him that night at the party. The bottom line is that Greg was fired because he missed too many days of work. Sometimes it is hard to make ends meet with just one paycheque. My brain is fried from pulling an all-nighter. Maria left the dishes in the sink all week to give Jeff a taste of his own medicine. Specific words and images make your writing more interesting to read. Whenever possible, avoid overly general words in your writing; instead, try to replace general language with particular nouns, verbs, and modifiers that convey details and that bring yours words to life.

Add words that provide colour, texture, sound, and even smell to your writing. General: My new puppy is cute. General: My teacher told us that plagiarism is bad. Specific: My teacher, Ms. Atwater, created a presentation detailing exactly how plagiarism is illegal and unethical. Revise the following sentences by replacing the overly general words with more precise and attractive language.

Write the new sentences on your own sheet of paper. Reilly got into her car and drove off. I would like to travel to outer space because it would be amazing. Jane came home after a bad day at the office. The dog walked up the street. The coal miners were tired after a long day. The tropical fish are pretty. I sweat a lot after running. The goalie blocked the shot.

I enjoyed my Mexican meal. Review a piece of writing that you have completed for school. On occasion, you will be asked to write an emotionally expressive or sensory piece—something like your journal entries. However, during your academic studies, your instructors will ask you to write essays that are fact based and academic in tone.

This means you will only be able to show your opinions by the choice of ideas you discuss and how you present your evidence. Your instructors will expect you to compose emotion-free papers, which means you have to choose your words carefully. When you write pieces full of emotion without facts, the reader is less likely to trust your argument. Imagine that you feel very strongly on an issue but do not use facts to support your argument.

What if the reader disagrees with you? Since you have not provided factual supporting evidence, the reader will not be convinced of your point of view. In this section, we will explore the impact of emotional writing and the impact on the reader; we will also explore word choices and their possible connotations.

To begin, look at the two passages in Self-Practice Exercise 2. This exercise will show you how simple changes in word choice and a writer using a lot of personal opinion will impact the reader. Look at the two passages below then answer the questions. Passage 1 What a glorious day! The beautiful sun is shining down on those basking, hoping to absorb its wonderful rays. The surf is playfully nudging the young children who are frolicking in the waves.

A group of smiling young people laugh joyously as they plan an exciting game of volleyball. As I watch their rousing game, I enjoy the feel of the warm sand playing between my toes. I love summer at the beach! Passage 2 It is way too hot! The sun is beating down on all those foolish enough to think it is healthy to get a suntan.

They will be sorry when they burn. I keep seeing unsupervised children getting knocked down by the strong waves, and their negligent parents are nowhere to be seen. Nearby, some rowdy teenagers keep laughing obnoxiously every time one in their group misses the volleyball; they are really terrible volleyball players. I would like to move from where I am sitting, but the sand is scorching hot and will burn my feet.

I wish I had stayed home! What are the differences in the physical setting that these passages are describing? Are they in different locations or happening at different times of day? Are there different people involved? Which one are you more likely to agree with?

Is this because it matches your personal opinion of the beach or because it is combined with supporting facts? It is clear that the two authors like or appreciate conditions and experiences differently. In Passage 1, the writer likes warm weather and does not mind noise, but in Passage 2, the writer would probably prefer to be at home in air conditioning. Ultimately, the passage that you connect with more is probably based on how you personally feel about going to the beach.

Because the passages are based solely on opinion, there is nothing in them to convince the reader that other perspectives or angles of vision are valid. This is why you need to use facts to back up your ideas when writing and of course include citations, which are discussed in Chapter 9 : Citations and Referencing. However, before we look at objective, fact-based writing, your first assignment will give you an opportunity to practise choosing your words to show differing perspectives; it will also help you to see how changing words can completely change the effect of the writing.

Choose a place where you can sit and observe for 15 to minutes. Then write a focused description of the scene that will enable the reader to see what you see. You will actually have to write two descriptions of the same scene. One will be of the scene from a positive or favourable perspective; the other needs to convey a negative or unfavourable impression.

Both descriptions must contain only factual details and must describe exactly the same scene from the same location at the same time. This means that you cannot just change the facts like making the weather cloudy instead of sunny; your descriptive words need to do the work for you. Length: combined total of to words. You can start with either the positive or negative paragraph, but remember, you do not want to just substitute antonyms, or opposite words, when writing from the opposite angle.

You want to step back from the scene, so to speak, and visualize how aspects of what you are experiencing or witnessing would appear to someone who did not feel the same way you do. Assignment 1 shows you that changing your wording even slightly can completely change the impact or effect.

On the morning of Saturday, June 10, I decided to visit the beach. The sky was clear with no clouds visible in the sky. I arrived at the beach at about , and it was already quite warm. Just before getting out of the car, I remembered to grab my 30 SPF sunscreen because I got burned so badly last year, and I do not want to experience that blistering again this year.

In front of me, there were five children who were about six years old playing in the foot-high waves; it looked like their parents were sitting watching them carefully from about four metres away probably just in case the waves got too high and they needed to dash to their children quickly. I chose a spot 10 metres to the right away from a group of young people, maybe 16 years old, playing volleyball, close enough to watch them having fun but far away enough to not get hit by any stray balls.

These teenagers must have been playing just for fun because it seemed like someone missed every second ball, and the entire group started laughing when they did. Thankfully I wore my sandals, so I could feel the warmth of the sand between my toes but protect my feet in case the sand got too hot. How is this passage different from the subjective examples in Self-Practice Exercise 2. What evidence beyond sensory perceptions and personal opinion does the writer provide? Is the passage more positive or negative?

Does it discuss both good and bad things? What is different about how the different perspectives are presented? In the passage above, the writer has presented both positive and negative situations, but the language she used is neutral and without judgment. The writer has linked bad past experiences and put a positive spin on them or was able to see possible negatives but also present solutions.

She also provided enough detail measurements, temperatures, distances, etc. Essentially, the writer presented a complete, unemotional, and objective perspective that is supported by quantifiable evidence. In the last chapter, we looked at ways to approach reading to help you understand, process, analyze, synthesize, and, ultimately, remember information better.

In this chapter, we will take this a step further by developing your skills in how to understand the material you read by helping you to distinguish the main ideas in a passage from the more specific supporting details. One way to do this is to recognize patterns, which will help you organize your thinking in systematic ways that parallel the presentation in the source.

Key terms for such patterns are:. Many people read to remember everything and do not distinguish between key concepts, key supporting details, positions relative to these concepts, and inferences that can be drawn. Creating a road map with these highlights helps you both to understand and to remember what you read. This section includes a few exercises to practise identifying the main and supporting ideas in passages representing the different patterns. Creating or identifying main ideas is like creating a skeleton that holds all the rest of the information together—creating a body.

Key facts are like muscles. The point of view and its implications are like the blood that gives life to the body. Some main ideas are directly stated; others are implied, and you must infer a statement yourself. When you read, you can identify the main idea of a paragraph, section, chapter, or book by asking yourself the following questions:. Read the three passages below and identify the main idea in each.

With the first two examples, the controlling idea is directly stated. Identify the main idea in both expressed in the topic sentence. In the third passage, t he main idea in the third passage is implied: choose the statement from the list given that best represents the entire paragraph and then explain why the other three statements do not work.

Passage 1: Identify the main idea in this paragraph. The population of communities is really made up of a set of publics. The needs and interests of a population are uniform on only the broadest matters, such as health and the security of the person and his or her property. Beyond those very broad areas of policy, needs and interests differ, sometimes very markedly, and sometimes in ways that cause conflict between competing interests.

It is highly unlikely that diverse needs or interests of all groups or individuals can all be satisfied at the same time. Thus, industrial firms that produce hazardous wastes may need sites to dispose of such undesirable by-products. Passage 2: Identify the main idea in this paragraph. Marketing research is a major component or subsystem within a marketing information system. It is used in a very wide variety of marketing situations. Typically, in a marketing research study the problem to be solved is first identified.

Then a researcher decides whether to use secondary or primary sources of information. To gather primary data, the researcher may use the survey, observation, or experimental method. Normally, primary data are gathered by sampling. Then the data are analyzed, and a written report is prepared. Passage 3: Identify the implied main point in this paragraph.

According to psychiatrist Richard Moscotti, the ability to work well is one key to a balanced life. He feels both underworking and overworking are to be avoided. A second key is the ability to love, which requires a certain amount of openness. The ability to be loved is the third key to a balanced life. This is difficult for those who feel unworthy of love. The last key is the ability to play, which involves knowing how to relax. State why the other three answers are not the unstated main idea.

Passage 1 m ain i dea : The population of communities is really made up of a set of publics. Passage 2 m ain Idea : Marketing research is a major component or subsystem within a marketing information system. Passage 3 m ain i dea implied : According to psychiatrist Richard Moscotti, the ability to work well is one key to a balanced life main elements: psychiatrist, R.

D is the answer: The unstated main idea is that, according to Moscotti, there are four keys to a balanced life. A : Too detailed to be the main idea; it expresses just one key B : A detail of the third key C : Too detailed to be the main idea; it is only one of four keys. Examples taken from: Langan, J. Marlton, NJ: Townsend Press. How did you do? Were you able to identify which were the more general statements from the supporting details?

Always remember that when identifying the topic sentence, all of the other ideas in that paragraph need to be an example or detail relating to that main point. If one of the ideas does not fit, either you have chosen a statement or idea that is too specific or the writer did not create a strong topic sentence in the paragraph. When we look at creating paragraphs and topic sentences in the next chapter, you will learn what creates a strong topic sentence, and this will help you with identifying them in the future.

Some details are more important than others in explaining, supporting, or developing the main idea. Others are further illustrations of details. Whichever words from whichever group are used, they will help the reader follow the logical organization of the material. Usually when you see these, a definition or concept preceded it. Time order Additive listing first, second, third, etc. You will also need to apply these throughout the rest of the chapters when developing sentences, paragraphs, and essays.

In Chapter Final Revisions and Peer Review , we will look at the punctuation that you need to use with these words. The next exercises will give you opportunities to practise identifying the main and key ideas in paragraphs. Survey, read, and identify the main points and key details in this paragraph. Eidetic imagery is the technical term for what most people know as photographic memory. People with eidetic imagery can recall every detail of a memory as clearly as if they were looking at a photograph.

People often wish they had this ability, but it can lead to trouble. For example, a law student with eidetic imagery was accused of cheating on an examination because his test paper contained exactly the words in his textbook. To prove his innocence, he studied an unfamiliar passage for five minutes and then wrote down more than words from it without making a mistake. Here are the answers: Main term: eidetic imagery Definition : photographic memory Details : can recall every detail of a memory as clearly as if they were looking at a paragraph Example : a law student with eidetic imagery was accused of cheating on an examination because his test paper contained exactly the words in his textbook.

Example taken from: Langan, J. Suffering from debilitating guilt causes many self-defeating behaviours in adulthood. We see adults submitting to the outrageous demands of partners or employers. We see individuals who appear to be constantly angry and then, almost immediately, guilty. We see adults who have felt lifelong depression.

The rage felt when shamed in childhood and when suffering from debilitating shame in adulthood is turned against the self because of the dependency on the other for survival. When we are rejected in adulthood by a mate or lover, the feelings we experience are anger at being rejected. Furthermore, if we suffer from debilitating shame, we have not been able to gain autonomy.

We continue to feel dependent upon attachment figures. It is from them, from their feelings, attitudes and opinions of us, that we feel worthwhile. To be angry at someone depended upon for survival causes us enormous guilt. Anger is redirected on the vulnerable self.

We become trapped in a circular bind of shame, anger, anxiety, guilt, and depression. Example taken from: Middleton-Moz, J. The methods of recognizing patterns discussed above are concrete and easy to identify. Inferences, on the other hand, are more subtle. When a writer implies something, he or she is giving hints but does not state the point directly. Think about a time, for example, when you had people visiting you at home; it was late, and you wanted them to leave.

Probably not, but you may have hinted that you had to wake up early in the morning, or you may have subtly yawned. Hopefully, those people picked up on your cues and inferred it was time to leave: meaning they put the pieces together to arrive at the conclusion you wanted them to leave, yet you did not say it directly. When a writer does this, the reader may not actually pick up on the hints or maybe even interpret them differently.

Sometimes readers make inferences that are based more on their own preferences and experience than on the information provided. This also means that two readers may interpret the same information differently because of differing individual experiences that led them to arrive at their conclusions. For you as a writer, you need to remember that it is your responsibility to give the readers everything they need in order for them to arrive at the conclusions you want them to make.

If you are not direct, readers may be left confused or not catch your point. There are also times that you as a reader will need to read passages requiring you to make inferences. The next exercises will help you to practise reading for inference. In these passages, you can also use a process of elimination and ask yourself statement best completes the passage.

R ead each passage and choose the answer that best completes the thought of the passage. Think about why the other answers would not be a correct conclusion to the passage. Check your answers against the key at the bottom of the exercise. If you miss ed an answer, look back and try to figure out why.

What clues did you focus on? What did you miss? Exercises taken from: Science Research Associates. Reading for Comprehension Exercises. SRA Achievement Series. Chicago: Science Research Associates. Check back if you missed any of the answers in this self-exercise. In which instances did you read into the passages your ideas when selecting an answer versus what is stated in the passage? In the next chapter, we will practise taking these main ideas and supporting ideas and put them into our own words, or paraphrase, to compose summaries which are very useful not only for remembering and studying information before tests but also for looking at sources and incorporating the information in them into your essays—essentially providing backing evidence to make your arguments more convincing.

Write a paragraph or two responding to the following. What did you notice about your writing style? Do you write more subjectively or objectively? Did you find that you struggled with one perspective or angle of vision over the other? What do you think you need to work on in regards to this? Which, if any, of the spelling and word choice issues do think you will have to focus on throughout the semester and in your writing in general?

Reflect on the goals you set in Chapter 1. Is there anything you would like to add or already feel more confident with doing? Remember as mentioned in the Assessment Descriptions in your syllabus :. Skip to content Main Body.

Of preposition. Means from or about. I studied maps of the city to know where to rent a new apartment. Have verb. Means to possess something. I have many friends to help me move. Quite, Quiet, Quit Quite adverb. Right, Write Right adjective. Set, Sit Set verb. Suppose, Supposed. Suppose verb. Means to think or to consider.

I suppose I will bake the bread, because no one else has the recipe. Means to suggest. Suppose we all split the cost of the dinner. Supposed verb. The past tense form of the verb suppose, meaning required or allowed. She was supposed to create the menu. Than conjunction. Used to connect two or more items when comparing. Registered nurses require less schooling than doctors. Use verb. Means to apply for some purpose. We use a weed whacker to trim the hedges. The past tense form of the verb to use He used the lawnmower last night before it rained.

Used to. Indicates something done in the past but not in the present He used to hire a team to landscape, but now he landscapes alone. Joins the words who and either is or has. Your pronoun. A form of you that shows possession. Your book bag is unzipped. Joins the words you and are. Key Takeaways In order to write accurately, it is important for writers to be aware of commonly confused words.

Choosing the proper words leaves a positive impression on your readers. Learning Objectives Identify common spelling rules Identify commonly misused homonyms Identify commonly misspelled words. When words end in a vowel plus y , keep the y and add the ending. Tip Remember to focus on spelling during the editing and revising step of the writing process.

Homonyms Homonyms are words that sound like one another but have different meanings. Lessen, Lesson Lessen verb. Passed, Past Passed verb. Patience, Patients Patience noun. Peace, Piece Peace noun.

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When I'm not busy teaching or creating products for TPT you can find me spending time with my husband and dog, cooking, or watercolor painting! Teachers Pay Teachers is an online marketplace where teachers buy and sell original educational materials. Are you getting the free resources, updates, and special offers we send out every week in our teacher newsletter? Seamlessly assign resources as digital activities. Learn More. Grade Level. Resource Type. Interactive resources you can assign in your digital classroom from TpT.

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Log In Join Us. View Wish List View Cart. Previous Next. Little Learning Ladybugs 2. Grade Levels. Spelling , Writing , Phonics. Assessment , Homework , Printables. Formats Included. This is also an easy way to check websites. If you have a file you want to check for misspelled words or grammatical errors, you can upload it to our servers and have it error checked automatically.

You can even upload images with text and they will be automatically converted to editable text and checked for spelling. If you have a file you want to check for misspelled words or grammatical errors, You can upload files directly from your cloud accounts like Google Drive, Dropbox and have it error checked automatically. We have one of the largest sets of dictionaries, with thousands of rules and we use a statistical corpus to find even rare errors. And this not only for the English language, but we also check text for misspelled words and grammatical errors for over 20 languages.

As explained above, spell checking and grammatical improvements of text can be made using three different main approaches. Our online converter uses all of them. Our servers are also quite powerful with lots of RAM to store the large corpus. They are also constantly updated and improvements are applied.

There is no need to install software on every device you own to proofread your text. Just open your browser on any device and you are set. And best of all, our spell checker is completely free. No one is perfect and we do not claim to find every error in your text.

That is just not possible with a machine-only check. If others claim they can do this automatically, it is just not correct. The last resort is always a human and even this person may fail from time to time.

Nevertheless, our online spellchecker will help you find the most errors and will also make suggestions for grammatical improvements. We have included a feature where you can tag words that have been marked as being spelled incorrect or grammatically wrong by our system, but are nevertheless correct e. If you have registered with us, this will allow you to mark these words and add them to your own personal dictionary.

We will use this information for your further checks. Furthermore, if you click on a word, we provide a dictionary entry with several possible meanings of said word.